Conservatorship Expert: The Difference Between Britney Spears and Amanda Bynes

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Last month, Amanda Bynes' mother declined the chance to become her daughter’s conservator just days before she was slated to appear in court about it on Sept. 30.

There's one major reason that people in Hollywood understand the idea of conservatorship: Britney Spears. It’s been six years since Britney’s shaved-head-and-umbrella-whacking mental breakdown in 2007, but she still remains under a conservatorship today.

"Britney Spears is under an extended conservatorship,” explains Wendy Feldman, a legal and mental health consultant in the state of California. "The difference with Amanda’s is that hers is a limited conservatorship, not full."

She explains further: ”There are a team of doctors who sign off on her, it’s not just one person. Like in Britney’s case, it’s her dad.”

Britney is about to launch a residency in Las Vegas, which will be bringing in major bucks for the "Til The World Ends" singer.

Feldman says it’s unlikely we’ll be seeing 27-year-old Amanda’s finances handled in a similar way. "Amanda's parents don't have control over new ventures with her money, as Britney's do,” she explains of the former Nickelodeon star. "They can only maintain what currently needs to be done like pay bills and work with her doctors to get her the help she needs."

It is unlikely that She's the Man star Amanda, who rumoredly suffers from schizophrenia, will be put under a full conservatorship right now, Feldman says.

The key difference between the two stars is that Britney was not in the middle of treatment when her father took full conservatorship. According to reports last month, a judge turned Amanda’s 2012 DUI case to a mental health court, where legal officials will determine if Amanda is mentally fit to stand trial.


Since then, the troubled star has reportedly been transferred from UCLA Medical Center to a private facility in Malibu where sources say she’s doing well. She's reportedly under an LPS hold, which is an involuntary mental health or psychiatric hold.

"Doctors will be keeping a very close eye on her. The goal for her is to help her re-enter into society, stabilize medication and mood," Feldman tells Life & Style.

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