dman108 (dman108) wrote in ohnotheydidnt,
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In Their Own Words: The Best Tell All Books Written By the Socially Elite



ONTD, What are your favorite tell alls, scandalous memoirs, and society books?






She was a modern-day Shirley Temple, but at the age of nine Drew Barrymore was drinking alcohol. At ten she took up marijuana, and by twelve she began snorting cocaine. Here is her gripping, heart-wrenching story--a story of a childhood gone awry and a young woman battling to restore order to her chaotic life.
(OP Note: This was not included with the original list so it's still 5/10)




A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, The Year of Magical Thinking is perhaps one of the finest books from Joan Didion, herself a national literary treasure. In her book, Didion recounts the year following the death of her husband, famed screenwriter John Gregory Dunne, and details with stunning clarity all of the sorrow, and joy, to be found in a shared life that was both beautiful and glamorous. A classic, and not to be missed.



Equestrian and NYC mayor daughter Georgina Bloomberg made waves last summer with the publication of The A Circuit, a young adult novel about Tommi, an heiress horse rider bent on proving her self worth. A New York Times article called the book "a portrait of a Bloomberg-like household that is intimate and unvarnished, riven by sibling rivalry, resentments over money and a Type A father bent on conventional success for his daughters." Bloomberg, known for his privacy in family life, had little to comment on his daughter's book, but perhaps "Tommi" says it best: “She wasn’t afraid to say no to her father, even if half of Wall Street was.”



In 1988, Gloria Vanderbilt watched her 23-year-old son Carter leap from their fourteenth-floor Manhattan terrace. "He let go," Gloria says, and her memoir recounts a grieving mother's struggle to come to terms with her son's death. Full of sorrow and wisdom, A Mother's Story reveals the cracks behind an heiress' gilded mirror, telling the story of a woman abandoned by her own mother at an early age, a person trying to become whole again after experiencing so much loss.



On February 4, 1974, publishing heiress Patty Hearst was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army, an urban militant group known for violence and bank robberies. In America’s most infamous case of Stockholm syndrome, the group brainwashed Ms. Hearst into joining their forces, where she abandoned her family and fortune, and assumed the new identity "Tania." Published over a decade later, this autobiography chronicles Patty Hearst’s astonishing experiences from her own point of view, a fascinating account that would later inspire the film Patty Hearst starring Natasha Richardson.



Nine marriages, seven divorces and one annulment later, one wonders if Zsa Zsa Gabor still agrees with the title of her autobiography, One Lifetime Is Not Enough. Born in Budapest in 1917, she's survived both World Wars (her mother, of Jewish descent, barely escaped Nazi-occupied Budapest in 1944), all of the aforementioned marriages, and being taken to the cleaners by Bernie Madoff, who allegedly left her down a cool $10 million in 2009. Sadly, the book doesn't make it that far -- it was published in 1991 -- but there's more than enough romance, scandal, and a record of bad come-on lines guys have tried on her in the past. Why use a cheap line on a woman famous for this one: "I am a marvelous housekeeper. Every time I leave a man I keep his house."


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Tags: books / authors, drew barrymore, drugs / alcohol, old hollywood, scandal
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