S (fitfortheunfit) wrote in ohnotheydidnt,
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Michael and Tim blog about last night's episode



MICHAEL'S TAKE:
Hooray for American Sportswear

What was great about Korto's winning design was that the minute you saw her model, she had an American vibe without being hokey. It's not just a tracksuit ... but I think it definitely has a nod to the athletic. I think it is comfortable. I think it shows off the body. And I think it's really graphic so you can see them from a distance and know who they are. It's really well done. And that often overused word -- it's very "modern" looking.

Korto is one to watch. Funny thing is she's got a lot of tricks up her sleeve. She's very versatile. And which, let's be honest, on Project Runway, that's a huge help. That is one way to keep us kind of surprised and excited to see what's next.

Jennifer's design was more fit for maybe the opening teapot ceremony while you're pouring tea and serving biscuits. I just think the idea of anything that's not sweet and darling is past her comprehension. So I think this got mommyish. On top of it, Ashley has the best body on the planet and this is all about someone who hates their body, No. 1. No. 2: I would never know it's America. No. 3: You'd roast wearing this on August 8th in Beijing ... it's gonna be 1000 degrees. There's nothing right about it.

The funny thing is, I think, you would assume that most of the designers are Americans. And American fashion has been founded on the idea of sportswear and the idea of clothes you can move in and that are graphic and that are sharp, and for some reason this really threw them for a loop. I think perhaps a lot of it has to do with you have either esoteric designers who had a problem with it or romantic designers had a problem with it. So it's an interesting thing to see what can trip them up and this should not have tripped them up. On top of it, you're dressing people who look great in clothes. So, it shouldn't be tricky.

TIM'S TAKE:
Rings Of Glory

I take the designers on a field trip to the Armory Track and Field Training Center in Washington Heights in the upper reaches of Manhattan. It contains the largest indoor track in the world and is the center for Olympic training for track and field events. There, we meet U.S. Olympian Apolo Ohno who presents the designers with their challenge: Create a womenswear look for the opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics. An additional highlight of our field trip is our visit to the National Track and Field Museum, which contains a rich resource of materials to help inform their designs. (But did some of the designers interpret the museum's historical images a little too literally?) The designers have 30 minutes to sketch in the museum. Then, we're off to MOOD with a budget of $150. And the designers have until the end of the day to complete their design.

Appropriately, and still thrilling, Apolo is our guest judge!

Korto WINS! She created an extremely sophisticated look: a white cotton/linen blend pant, a stretch satin camisole, and a white leather vest with red shoulder insets and a black mandarin collar. There was an unexpected aspect to the all-white look, and the construction and fit were perfection. Furthermore, you could easily see how this look could successfully morph into menswear, which is not an unimportant element in this challenge. Congratulations, Korto!



Jennifer is OUT. Oh, I reflect upon our museum visit and Jennifer's demise all makes sense to me: She saw the historical images (some of them being adorable dresses that looked like they were going to a garden party) and she saw the "Nike" refrain (the flying foot of the Greek goddess who personifies victory) and became entranced. Jennifer designed a gold and white striped high-waisted skirt (with an odd "purse" on the back, I'll add) and paired it with a navy shrunken jacket with the museum's Nike symbol appliquéd in sequins on each lapel. Yes, it was a touch of Schiaparelli, but the whole look was too girly and too child-like. Jennifer, we'll miss your intellect and your good humor, really!



Blayne began with a white jacket with Sgt. Pepper detailing. (He didn't know the iconic Beatles reference! I am an olde farte!) I feared that there were too many "Members Only" allusions in the jacket's design, so I was relieved that he modified it into a one-shouldered top. This was paired with a white skinny pant. I found his look to be fairly lackluster and even anemic, as though he was merely flirting with his intentions. But, his design was more athletic looking than most others. Holla, Blayne!



Daniel finds it difficult to step away from his comfort zone. Yes, he possesses a sophisticated, high-end point of view, but does than exclude everything other than cocktail dresses. His blue dress with red satin piping (although whether the dress was blue or purple is debatable), was lovely, but hardly innovative and head-scratchingly odd for the Olympics. If her were designing uniforms for Olympic Air, then I'd be a believer.



Jerell, oh Jerell! Did he listen to the content of the challenge? I'm still reeling over the look that he created: a high-waisted skirt in vertical stripes with a horizontally striped waistband; a pink top with ruffled cap sleeves; and red, white and blue polka-dot bib kerchief, black leggings(!), and this all topped off with a wide-brimmed hat. In another context, this look could be fun and sexy, but for the Olympics? Preposterous!



Joe embraced an all white palette. He designed a skort (a combination of skirt and short) with a wide cuff and a jacket with red, white and blue stripe details. The stripes were rather painterly (i.e. random) in their placement, but the red trim on the collar, cuffs and hem helped give the jacket some definition. And he spelled out "U.S.A." on the skort. The look was nothing if not patriotic, but it was also nothing if not dull ... 



Keith created a white, sleeveless tunic-like top that descended into a blue-and-white print mini bubble skirt. The tunic had a high, exaggerated collar that was further accentuated with a billowing red and blue scarf. I thought his model looked like an ice skater. Isn't this the Summer Olympics?



Kelli designed a look that is more sweet than sophisticated. She used a small-scale red and white print for the top with a white embossed bib insert and sleeve detail. This was paired with a navy skirt with odd extension that look like oversized pockets, especially for their being piped in white. The look was '40s reto with absolutely no semblance of modernity. Was it the influence of the museum, again?



Kenley entered into this challenge with immunity, so she could have napped through it and still been safe. She created a cocktail dress with a white satin cap-sleeved top with a modified bateau neckline (irreparably stained by model's makeup during the fitting) and a high-waisted large-scale purple and white plaid skirt on the bias with a non-bias waistband. In the paraphrased words of Lucy Ricardo, "Kenley, if that's the look you want, then you sure have a good one!"



Leanne, what happened? She designed another all-white look, this one with a cuffed short and a sleeveless top with a dramatic stand-up collar in layers of red, white and blue. The collar looked haphazard and lacked polish. And with all that was happening with this look, did she really need the button placket of the top to be off-center? This look was reto-modern, like an episode of "The Jetsons." Leanne, I'm just glad that you're still here.



Stella, oh Stella. How is it that you continue to persist? Black stretch satin Capri pants and vest? Dark red, silver, and blue leather chevrons and waistband? An exposed midriff? Biker Olympics? Enough said.



Suede has even me speaking in the third person! His design was another head-scratcher: a navy ballerina skirt with red and white ribbon detail at the hem, paired with a white halter-top. The look brought to mind a majorette or a cheerleader, but an Olympian? Tim is very confused, very confuse, indeed.



Terri designed the most classic American look of the group. It was successful, it was stunning, it was appropriate, and it was ambitious. She created a menswear tailored jacket with a wide lapel over a horizontal striped strapless top, accessorized with an ascot-like scarf. Below, she had a beautifully fitting white pant with a tuxedo stripe on the right leg, only. I swooned. So as happy as I am for Korto, why didn't Terry win?

source one source two

the video

^ Oh yeah, the designers discuss which television shows they'd like to make a cameo on. It's old but it was never posted and some of the answers are lol-worthy. 

Thanks aprilbegins for pointing out the missing picture!

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