Jodie Foster covers More magazine

 

More magazine: Let’s talk about your ring.
Jodie Foster: This one? [Proffers left hand] It’s Tiffany, an eternity ring.

More magazine: You’re wearing it on your wedding ring finger.
Jodie Foster: I am. I’ve always worn a ring. Even taking photos. Even on magazine covers. I don’t take it off.

More magazine: Don’t you think wearing a ring like that raises questions?
Jodie Foster: Well, but that’s my life. I thought about this recently: I had a nightmare the other night. Well, anyway. . .

More magazine: C’mon! Let’s hear the nightmare!
Jodie Foster: I was being interviewed by somebody, like an innocuous [press] junket thing. They were asking me questions about food I liked or whatever. Then they said, [in a high, innocent voice] “Have you ever written any homemade anti-Semitic cards?” And I was like, [horrified] “No!” Then she said, “Come with me,” and I realized to myself, “You’re so stupid. Haven’t you ever seen that 60 Minutes thing where they ask you a banal question? You’re not supposed to say yes or no. You’re supposed to go, ‘Well, that’s interesting.’ Because if they ask you the banal question, it’s because they have some kind of document on you. And now you’ve got to go! And now the camera’s going to follow you!” Then my dream was over. [Pauses and reflects before continuing]

My life is my life. I’m not going to change my life for anybody. I don’t have any problems with it. I just don’t talk about my health, my dad, who I voted for or what I think of the death penalty, because that would be trivializing my life, selling it for a magazine.” 

On privacy:
“In 20 years, people will look back on my life and I’ll be 65 and Britney Spears will be 45, and I think by then people will understand the value of privacy.”

On her idols:
“Katharine Hepburn had a really long career. I look forward to aging on-screen, to making movies when I’m 65, 70, to playing the parts of real older women. I’d love to have the career of Meryl Streep. But I’m not sure I’ll want to work as much as she does in her fifties.”

On plastic surgery:
“It’s not my thing…I’d rather have somebody go, ‘Wow, that girl has a big nose” than “Wow, that girl has a bad nose job.’ I’d rather have a comment about who I am than about something that identifies me as being ashamed of who I am.”

On gun control:
“Isn’t it possible that we all have that bit of insanity in us? That’s why I’m for gun control. Absolutely. Hunting, I get that – let’s protect hunting. But I don’t believe that people should have access to life-or-death situations at any emotional time in their life. I don’t really believe that a human being who feels [things] should have the option at their fingertips.”

About the loneliness of an actor:
“Whether I like to admit it or not – and usually I don’t like to admit it – the stuff I do affects me. It’s this strange lonely thing. It’s hard to explain what it is to lie in a pool of fake blood for four days and just be thinking those thoughts…There’s a real sadness to it. So I don’t want to do that more than once a year.”

On being famous:
“I’ve learned a lot of lessons over the years. One is that if I weren’t famous again and no one knew who I was, I’d be perfectly happy.”

On family:
“Every once in a while I’ll have one of those days when I’ve fed the fish, cleaned 10 poops from the patio, taken the cat to the vet, sewn my son’s stupid karate stars on until my fingers bleed and made sure that he has everything, and he wakes up and goes, ‘Oh, what’s for breakfast?’ he doesn’t know, and why should he? Right? But there’s absolutely no sort of acknowledgements or reward for this – except for the intangible of my kids growing up to be wonderful people. I do find myself in the garage listening to NPR because I want to have a stimulating side to my life…The only thing about having kids is that I miss being alone.”

On the upside of being 44:
“I think the pressure’s off. The hardest part of my personal neuroses is that I feel responsible for everything. I put so much pressure on myself, and I always did as a kid. There’s a nice thing about turning a certain age where you’ve made so many life decisions; so many nonchosen paths are behind you, and you don’t have to worry about them anymore.”
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