onlytheycreate (onlytheycreate) wrote in ohnotheydidnt,
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Three Billboards Is a Film for People Who "Want To Feel Better About Their Racist Family Members"


– Writer Hanif Abdurraqib went on NBC News THINK to talk about the clumsy and unnecessary racism in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missisouri. He makes a comparison of it to Crash, which has haunted all of our lives since March 5th, 2006 8:00 PM EST.
– Abdurraqib posits that the racism in the film is completely pointless to the story. Sam Rockwell's character Dixon is a police officer who is known around town and among the precint for torturing black suspects, but it's only purpose is to let us know he's a violent asshole. The actual story is supposedly about Frances seeking justice for her daughter being assaulted and murdered.
– There are no actual black characters in Three Billboards. The only one with any presence in the film is the Good Police Chiefplayed by Clarke Peters who fires Dixon for beating a man and throwing him out a window. Like Woody Harrelson, who didn't fire Dixon or anyone else for torturing black inmates, Peters is just there to assure viewers that most cops are good guys and the bad ones can learn to forgive themselves or something.
– Also, the man Dixon beats is gay. Yes, that's right. There's random homophobia in this movie too, uses of the f-word, and later in the film after Dixon performs some contrived self-sacrifice, the gay man forgives him in the hospital. There are hints Dixon might be gay, because we can't have homophobia in something without it falling solely on the shoulders of a closeted gay person. Peter Dinklage is also in the movie and adds onto poorly handled social stigmas with ableism when Frances expresses how she doesn't wanna fuck him a couple times.
– Abdurraqib points to a scene early on in the film where Frances' character uses the n-word, calling Dixon an n-word "torturer". Dixon then spits back with "persons of colors torturer", also using the n-word, and it goes back and forth like a bizarre comedy scene where he's the quirky racist cop.


"If your entry point to your story is that you're torturing black people, your redemption arc becomes a little more steep. You have a sharper incline and a longer way to get there. And there's nothing wrong with complicating a character, and there's nothing wrong with making a character who has done some wrong things also be heroic. But the problem with Dixon's redemption arc at the end is that it's not tied to any actual redemption.

We're introduced to him early in the film by way of finding out that he's tortured black suspects, we see him unjustly imprison one of the only black people in the town, and then by the end of the movie we are almost asked to root for him, or at least feel for him in a way that he's being complicated, but there's no redemption tied to his complication, we don't see him make amends for any of the ill he's done. He just reevaluates himself."






ONTD, did you like Crash? And The Blind Side? And Gran Torino? Do you think this movie will win Best Picture tomorrow in Trump's America? I hated sitting through this so much and just wanna shit talk it so lets go.

Sources: 1 2 3 4 5 6
Tags: award show - nominees / winners, film - drama, race / racism, sam rockwell
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