onlytheycreate (onlytheycreate) wrote in ohnotheydidnt,
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The Bad and Lazy Worldbuilding of Netflix's Fantasy Film "Bright"


– Lindsay Ellis made a video essay taking down Netflix's Bright, specifically how everything wrong about it is built on its core problem of lazy worldbuilding and writing. It was directed by Suicide Squad's David Ayer, "written" by scum of the earth Max Landis, and cost $90 million to make.
– Ellis draws a comparison between Bright and movies like "Crash", which was also bad but largely praised at the time, and had a terrible understanding of race and social issues, and how Hollywood builds worlds of racial allegories without wanting to offend casual racists, or their target audience. She also goes into examples of fantasy allegories, including the racism of Lord of the Rings, secret worlds and alternate realities, and why Bright's is a problem right from its very premise into the nitty gritty deetails.
– "Movies like Bright 'seek to understand the logic behind racism', but racism isn't logical, and you can't logic people out of a mindset they did not logic themselves into."
– Joel Edgerton (the orc Jacoby) recently said he'd rather think about the people who watched Bright than the bad reviews it got. "All I know is what was reported, which was something like—whatever number was reported—something like 11 million that first weekend. Whatever it was, it amounted to a $100 million-plus opening weekend. But, I have to be honest, that’s considering that people don’t have to get in their car, go buy a ticket, go buy the popcorn. There’s a certain age where you can roll over and press play on the remote control. But, according to them, the numbers were there.” So, it was for the people not the critics, etc. Sounds like Suicide Squad.
Bright has a 29% critic rating and a 7.3 audience rating on Metacritic.
– A sequel was greenlit in January, as Netflix was always planning on building the film into a tentpole franchise or universe. Max Landis will not be part of the project this time around.






ONTD, what do you think of her argument? And what are the best and worst examples of social allegories you've seen in film, literature, and beyond?

Sources: 1 2 3 4 5
Tags: behind the scenes, books / authors, film - fantasy, netflix, race / racism, will smith
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