Guardians of the Galaxy Easter Eggs(5): Trivia, References, Callbacks, Cameos and More





Guardians of the Galaxy might be Marvel’s most elaborate film to date when it comes to easter eggs. I’ve watched the film twice now and have noticed a ton of inside jokes, references to characters from the comic books, 1980′s callbacks and more.I attempted to compile the most complete listing of Guardians of the Galaxy easter eggs, including (possible spoilers teased in the following):





Who is Peter Quill’s Father?


In the movie Starlord’s father is teased in a couple different ways. In the opening of the film, an ill Meredith Quill tells Peter that his father was an angel made entirely of light. After the final battle of the film, the Nova Corps reveal to Peter that they have found something strange when they scanned him. Quill says, “You mean I’m not Terran?” and Nova Prime responds that his mom is human, but that his father is something incredibly ancient that hasn’t been seen before. Gamora theorizes that his mysterious biology might be why he was able to hold the Infinity Stone for so long without being destroyed. And a quick scene with Yondu Udonta (Michael Rooker) reveals that he was originally hired to abduct 11-year-old Quill to deliver the boy to his “jerk” father, which he decided against.

So who is Peter Quill’s father? Here is some information on the comic book backstory of the character courtesy of the ComicVine database:



Once there was a man called Prince Jason of Spartoi, and he was wrongly accused of being a traitor by his father. This action caused Jason to run away. When war broke out Jason was asked to come back home. But on the way home Jason’s ship converter blew out. He then had to make a crash landing in the Earth’s Colorado Mountains. A woman named Meredith Quill helped him out of the ship. She would get him back on his feet and help rebuild his ship. He fell in love with her and conceived a child. In order to return to the war he had to leave Meredith behind so she wouldn’t get hurt. Jason locked her memories so that she would be spared the pain he felt. … When the war against Spartoi and Ariguan had been in Spartoi’s favor, Jason asked his uncle Gareth to bring his family to him. But, instead Gareth put a hit on the Quill family. When Peter was eleven he saw men come in and kill his mother. The men left not knowing Peter was there. Peter swore that he would kill those men. Gareth had told Jason that his family had died during birth. Peter with much hope ran away from his orphanage to go to a greater destiny.


Now of course, the comic book storyline doesn’t play out with 11-year-old Peter escaping after aliens killed his mother. The fiery symbol which Star-Lord wears in the movie is actually the insignia of his father’s race, the Spartoi. Screenwriter Nicole Pearlman’s original draft of Guardians of the Galaxy involved Quill finding out about his father, and visiting the king on his planet. When it was revealed Nathan Fillion has a small part in Guardians, some fans speculated that he may be playing J’son of Spartax. He does not, but more on that later.


The Fourth Infinity Gem


Guardians of the Galaxy introduces us to the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s fourth Infinity gem. The Orb which Peter Quill steals from the Morag temple ruins contains the Power Gem (confirmed by Gunn). Star-Lord himself describes the orb as possessing “a real Ark of the Covenant, Maltese Falcon vibe”. So there are only two more Infinity Gems not introduced on screen (as far as we know).

Everyone is expecting Avengers 3 to be about Thanos and the Infinity Gauntlet storyline. The classic comic book story was released as a six-issue comic book limited series in 1991. Written by Jim Starlin and penciled by George Pérez and Ron Lim, the story involved Thanos gaining control of the six Infinity Gems, which he mounted on his left glove to form the Infinity Gauntlet.



Each Gem grants its bearer complete mastery over one aspect of the multiverse: Time, Space, Mind, Soul, Reality, and Power. Now all-powerful and desperate to win the affections of Death, Thanos decides to offer the entity a gift of love by completing a task she had given him, erasing half the sentient life in the universe (including most of the X-Men, Daredevil, and the Fantastic Four),quite literally with a snap of his fingers. The surviving heroes on Earth band together—guided by the newly resurrected Adam Warlock—to battle Thanos.




In the current Marvel Cinematic Universe, Loki’s staff is with Baron von Strucker on Earth (speculated by many fans to be an infinity gem), the Tesseract is on Asgard with Thor (or someone), the Aether is with The Collector on Nowhere and the Orb is on Xandar protected by the Nova Corps.



The Infinity Gauntlet has already appeared on screen in a Marvel Studios film, however very briefly. The infamous glove could be seen in the background of Odin’s treasure room during the attack by Frost Giants in Thor, seen above.



Inside The Collector’s Museum


There are a ton of Marvel comic book and movie references to be found inside the containers in The Collector’s museum. Director James Gunn told us in July:



There’s a lot of stuff in the Collector’s Museum. And for me, it was mostly just really fun. As a Marvel fan, giving the actual fans something that they can freeze frame on their Blu-Ray at home and just kind of pick out everything that’s in there. So there are, I mean, seriously all those boxes have something interesting in them, so it’s pretty fun.


Marvel head Kevin Feige explained to us how they chose which easter eggs to hide:



It’s the scene that was, you know, that we always wanted to do. The Collector. And we wanted to use him the way we use him in there. But as it came time to fill all those things, it became crazy, crazy potential.


Here are a few that have been confirmed:



Cosmo the Space Dog: A former test animal of the Soviet Space Program, Cosmo was launched into Earth’s orbit as part of an experiment but he drifted off into space, where he became mutated and gained powers of a telepathy and telekinesis. He came to serve as Knowhere’s security chief, and a member of the Guardians of the Galaxy. In the movie, Cosmo the Space Dog (played by Fred the Dog) escapes the destruction of the Collector’s Museum and is likely roaming around Knowhere. The end credits scene features Cosmo licking the face of The Collector before he runs off.  So if the Guardians set up shop in the celestial head, they could eventually adopt a new four legged member of the crew.



Howard the Duck: Blink and you’ll miss him during the movie — Howard The Duck can be seen sitting in a cage hanging from the ceiling of The Collector’s museum. But if you stick around until the end of the credits you will get to see and hear the forgotten Marvel character up close talking to the Collector in his destroyed lab. Marvel head Kevin Feige talked briefly to CBR about the cameo:



[Laughs] I think it would be fun to lay claim to Howard and to remind people that he’s more than just a pseudonym for film failure. And that he is a Marvel character. That would be fun. And no legal wrangling over pants with Disney this time! No. I wasn’t even aware of all that stuff until recently!


Ain’t It Cool News was able to confirm that Seth Green was the voice of Howard the Duck in the post-credits stinger. Howard The Duck was actually the first Marvel character to have a theatrical feature film. The infamous 1986 film was produced by George Lucas. Also of Note: Marvel recently made a bunch of the Howard the Duck comics available online.



A Dark Elf: The Collector’s assistant is seen cleaning the cage of a dark elf, an ancient race believed to be completely eradicated by the Asgardians many years ago. We saw the Dark Elfs in Thor: The Dark World. Is it possible that Sif and Volstagg dropped him off while they were delivering the Aether? Gunn has revealed that the dark elf is “played by Doug Jones, one of our stunt guys.”"



A Chitauri Soldier: A Chitauri soldier is seen in one of the cages. You remember the Chitauri as the alien invaders who attacked earth in the battle of New York in The Avengers. There is no indication if this Chitauri was involved in the Earth battle or if he was acquired elsewhere in the galaxy.



The Tesseract aka The Cosmic Cube: You may remember that in the credits scene ofThor: The Dark World, Sif and Volstagg visit The Collector and hand him the Aether, because they don’t feel comfortable having two infinity stones so close together on Asgard. Of course, the reveal was that The Tesseract/Cosmic Cube is the other infinity stone, for now “safe” in the Asgardian safe. So, while the Tesseract isn’t actually in The Collector’s museum, in Guardians of the Galaxy a holographic image of it can be seen when the Collector is giving Peter Quill and Gamora his lesson on the history of the Infinity Stones, along with the Aether (which is in the museum somewhere).


A Cocoon, But Whose?


One of the Collector’s treasures, more visible in the Thor: The Dark World end credits sequence (screencaped above), shows a container with a large cocoon. Fans  noticed that the strange cacoon looks like the cocoon from the comics which housed Adam Warlock, seen below:


Director James Gunn has since confirmed that it is Adam Warlock’s cocoon.

Adam Warlock made his Marvel comics debut in Fantastic Four #66 (published September 1967) in cocoon form. Warlock is an artificially created being designed by researchers at a complex known as the “Beehive”. One of his special abilities allows him to spin a regenerative cocoon around him at will in a matter of seconds. When questioned about the possibility of a Nova or Adam Warlock solo films, Marvel head Kevin told MoviePilot that they could appear in the sequel:



I think if Guardians works the way we certainly hope it works, that would probably be the franchise to meet a lot of those people. That would be our entrance into numerous other cosmic folk. If we spin those out into individual movies, that’s a question for down the line. But I think we would see those kinds of characters in a future Guardians movie.


So Adam Warlock also likely escaped the destruction of the Collector’s musuem, and if the Marvel comic books are used for source material, Warlock could be around for the already mentioned Infinity Gauntlet storyline the whole cosmic second and third phases seems to be leading up to.



Beta-Ray Bill? A bunch of comic book fans believe they have spotted Beta-Ray Bill in the pan shot of The Collector’s Museum. Described as “some kind of brownish figure with a red cape behind glass” to the right of the Collector. We can’t confirm this appearance, although many people believe they saw the horse-headed alien in the museum. Created by writer-artist Walt Simonson, Beta Ray Bill first appeared in Thor #337 (published November 1983). He belongs to an alien belonging to a race known as the Korbinites, and is the first “being outside of the Marvel Universe’s Norse pantheon to be deemed worthy enough to wield Thor’s hammer, Mjolnir.”



Space Slug From Slither: And there are even some fun references from outside of the Marvel universe hidden in this scene, including a space slug from James Gunn’s horror film Slither, confirmed by Kevin Feige.

The Collector’s Museum is left in ruins at the conclusion of Guardians of the Galaxy, but director James Gunn hints that we might see more of that character and his many treasures in future Marvel films like the announced 2017 sequel.



“I will say that is probably not the Collector’s only museum,” he said. “I think he probably has other spaces in which he keeps his incredibly vast selection. That’s just his Knowhere wing [in the movie].”


1980′s References


Peter Quill is abducted in the later 1980′s and the character surrounds himself with relics from that era of Terran popculture. But some of the references are less obvious than the stickers and figures he uses to decorate his spaceship, seen above.



For instance, director James Gunn has confirmed that Star-Lord’s spaceship is named the Milano after his childhood crush on television star Alyssa Milano (Who’s The Boss).

Visit Milano with Chris Pratt



Sony TPS-L2 Walkman


Peter Quill’s Sony TPS-L2Walkman was introduced in the 1980s childhood-set Earth opening of the film. The piece of 1980′s technology set off a revolution in music much the same way as the introduction of the iPod decades later. The prop department had a hard time finding good quality Sony TPS-L2Walkmans for the film. The production bought the only 16 of this specific Sony Walkman that were listed on eBay over a 6 month period, and only 3 of the 16 actually worked. (Gunn told us they are now in the Marvel archives waiting for part two).



Footloose

Quill refers to Kevin Bacon as a great hero on his planet, telling Gamora the story of the 1984 film Footloose:



Really? Well, on my planet, there’s a legend about people like you. It’s called Footloose. And in it, a great hero, named Kevin Bacon, teaches an entire city full of people with sticks up their butts that dancing, well, it’s the greatest thing there is.


The parody art above is the cover of Backstory Magazine this month. After seeingGuardians of the Galaxy, Kevin Bacon tweeted the following:







John Stamos

Peter Quill mentions that John Stamos was a legendary outlaw from where he’s from. The year before Quill was abducted, a show began airing on television called Full House wich featured John Stamos as “Uncle Jesse”, the Tanner’s cool Rock & Roll uncle who drove a motorcycle and played guitar. After seeing the film, John Stamos tweeted:



Books

Our friends at Screenrant noticed the following two references to books:


  • Peter Quill refers to Groot as “Giving Tree,” alluding to the classic 1964 children’s book by Shel Silverstein.

  • Later Quill calls Rocket Raccoon “Ranger Rick”, a reference to the children’s nature magazine which featured illustrated short stories of an anthropomorphized raccoon ranger named Rick.







for more check out the Source since we can't post the whole list