Elliott Rodger Was Enraged at “Ugly Black Filth” Who Dated White Girls & Parents Tried To Stop Him

Before mass shooter Elliot Rodger, 22, went on a killing spree, gunning down six people and wounding eight in a southern California college town, he detailed his reasoning in a 137 page manifesto.

Judging from the manifesto left by the Santa Barbara shooter, he was a socially awkward, mentally disturbed young man. He was also a racist who couldn’t understand why women didn’t like him. In his rant, he lamented over the fact that even an “ugly black boy” could get a date with a white girl but he couldn’t. In Rodger’s mind, he was superior because he was mostly white, and should’ve gotten girls solely based on his white privilege.

How could an inferior, ugly black boy be able to get a white girl and not me? I am beautiful, and I am half white myself. I am descended from British aristocracy. He is descended from slaves. I deserve it more. I tried not to believe his foul words, but they were already said, and it was hard to erase from my mind. If this is actually true, if this ugly black filth was able to have sex with a blonde white girl at the age of thirteen while I’ve had to suffer virginity all my life, then this just proves how ridiculous the female gender is. They would give themselves to this filthy scum, but they reject ME? The injustice!

You can read the manifesto here.

The parents of Santa Barbara shooter Elliot Rodger had read his chilling manifesto and were frantically trying to stop their son carry out his plan when they heard of the massacre on the radio, it emerged Sunday.

The 22-year-old had emailed the 140-page document to a couple of dozen people including his parents and at least one of his therapists just hours before he went on his shooting rampage Friday night, family friend Simon Astaire told CNN.

Lichin Rodger, the suspect's mother, reportedly received the email at 9.17pm and immediately went on to her son's YouTube page where she found the newly uploaded video titled 'Retribution' which describes his plan of 'slaughtering' women at a sorority house at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

According to CNN, Mrs Rodger then alerted her estranged husband, Peter, and after he watched the video she called 911. The former couple then set off from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara to try find their son.

But they were too late, and, according to Mr Astaire, they heard about the shooting en route.
Later that night, their worst fears were confirmed when they were told their son was behind the massacre that left six victims dead and 13 injured.

The new details come as detectives searched the home of Mrs Rodger Sunday, carrying out boxes of evidence.
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives officers were pictured leaving her West Hills, California, home after conducting a search that included the bins.

Media swarmed the officers as they walked back to their cars but they stated that they couldn't answer any questions.

Mr Astaire told CNN that the killer's parents thought a run in with police in April could have been a lost opportunity to prevent the bloodshed.
After Mrs Rodger came across his YouTube videos in April, she called one of his therapists, who then called a Santa Barbara mental health hotline, Astaire said.

A woman on the hotline called police to check on him and six policemen showed up at his house in Isla Vista on April 30.
But, crucially, it has now emerged that they hadn't seen the videos even though those recordings were what prompted his parents to call authorities.

They reported back to the Sheriff that they found nothing alarming and called his mother to reassured her that he was OK.
Elliot Rodger's parents now believe that well-being check was a 'pivotal moment' and they are frustrated, Mr Astaire said, describing it as a 'missed opportunity' to find out what was wrong.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Kelly Hoover said the sheriff's office 'was not aware of any videos until after the shooting rampage occurred.'

Sheriff Bill Brown has defended the officers' actions, but the case highlights the challenges that police face in assessing the mental health of adults, particularly those with no history of violent breakdowns, institutionalisations or serious crimes.

'Obviously, looking back on this, it's a very tragic situation and we certainly wish that we could turn the clock back and maybe change some things,' Brown told CBS' 'Face the Nation' on Sunday.

'At the time deputies interacted with him, he was able to convince them that he was OK,' he said.
It's not clear why the deputies did not become aware of the videos.

Rodger, writing in a manifesto, said he was relieved his apartment wasn't searched because deputies would have uncovered the cache of weapons he used in the beach town rampage Friday in which he killed six people and then, authorities say, himself.

This comes as the aunt of British born murderer Elliot Rodger made an impassioned appeal on Sunday to Barack Obama and the U.S. authorities to 'Stop the slaughter.'

Jenni Rodger, 55, who lives in south west France, said: 'He was a sick kid – somebody who was seriously mentally disturbed – and yet he was able to get hold of guns.'

Ms Rodger said such attacks had become all too frequent in a country where weapons can be bought with ease – even by students.

'What kind of a society allows this?' said Ms Rodger. 'How can this be allowed to happen? I want to appeal to Americans to do something about this horrific problem.

'I want the president and the authorities to finally stop these killings. The only possible good thing that can come out of all this is America finally taking action.'

Ms Rodger said she had only met Elliot three times, and the last time 'a few years ago and only for a few minutes.'
But she knew that he was 'extremely sick, and had no friends at all.' Ms Rodger added: ‘He did not seem to have any kind of support network. He was on medication
'Even as a small child he was obsessed with folding and refolding his clothes, and he never used to laugh. I never heard of him ever having a friend.’
Ms Rodger, who lives in Cazals, not far from Toulouse, said the shooter’s grandmother Lois, 88, of Ashford, Kent, was 'in grief' at the news.
'I can't get my head around it. The whole family is in absolute shock – we don't know where to turn.

Mr Rodger added that the family are staunchly against guns, saying he had no idea how his son got hold of a firearm.

Police did not find a history of guns, but did say Rodger 'didn't have a lot of friends,' and didn't have any girlfriends.

He was diagnosed at an earlier age with Asperger's Syndrome, a high-functioning form of autism meaning he had difficulties with social interaction.

Mr Astaire said he'd been seeing therapists on and off since he was 8 years old and during high school met with one 'pretty much every day.'

Recently, Rodgers was seeing two therapists, Mr Astaire told CNN, describing the young man as 'reserved to a daunting degree' but never showed any fascination with guns. He had legally bought all three weapons used in the rampage, law enforcement sources told CNN.
He said Perth Rodgers told him a week ago that the boy was doing well 'at the moment.'

Elliot Rodger was living with roommates at the Independent Living Institute in Santa Barbara, a facility that offers 'living skills instruction to help adults with disabilities to live more independently in their communities,' according to the website.

Mr Shifman added: 'My clients’ mission in life will be to try and prevent any such tragedies from ever happening again.
'This country, this world needs to address mental illness and the ramifications from not recognizing these illnesses.'