2014 World Cup sex bans: The teams allowed to do it and the teams that aren't



Mexico coach Miguel Herrera has banned his team from having sex during the World Cup. "If a player can't go one month or 20 days without having sexual relations, then they are not prepared to be a professional player," he told newspaper Reforma. Though the effects of sex for athletes have long been debated, for Mexico this ban is rooted in practical thinking.

Two prostitution scandals in the last four years have resulted in a total of 10 suspensions and over a dozen fines for various members of the team, so Herrera apparently feels that the simplest way to avoid another incident is to just ban sex altogether. But Mexico aren't the only team that have already passed a ruling on whether players will be allowed to get their freak on in Brazil. Here's a list that is sure to grow in the coming weeks.

Against sex (or variations of it) at the World Cup

-Mexico

-Bosnia and Herzegovina: They have an absolute sex ban while in Brazil thanks to coach Safet Susic, who wants military discipline from his squad. But he did add, "They can find another solution, they can even masturbate if they want." Maybe he's hoping that limitation breeds creativity both on and off the pitch.

-Brazil: Players are allowed to have "normal sexual intercourses" but sexual "acrobatics" have been denied.

-Nigeria: Former national team captain and coach Christian Chukwu has recommended a sex ban to current coach Stephen Keshi. "In my days as a player even as a coach, I made it a point of duty to stay away from women because sex has a lot of spiritual things attached to it," says Chukwu. It's unclear if Keshi will take this advice, though.

Not against sex at the World Cup

-France: Coach Didier Deschamps has said he won't completely prohibit players from having sex, but "it all depends on when, how and how much." When the press pointed out to him that there is a brothel just 500 meters from France's World Cup base, Deschamps threatened to keep "files" on the journalists who go there, just as they do with the players.

-England: Roy Hodgson hasn't taken a definitive position on the matter yet, but when he led Switzerland to the 1994 World Cup, he initially banned sex, but changed his mind before the tournament began. Switzerland finished second in Group A that year, just ahead of the USA.

-All other teams, presumably: The fact that this is still an issue to consider in the year 2014 is more than a little weird.

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