Donald Sterling Accused Of Making Racist Comments About Beyonce, Kim K & Others

Donald Sterling made racist comments about everyone from Beyonce to Charles Barkley ... if you believe an ex-Clippers "janitor" who filed for a restraining order against Sterling -- except no one in their right mind would believe this guy.

TMZ obtained a copy of the court doc filed Friday by a Cliff Paul (yes, like the State Farm commercial) who claims he is ... related to Chris Paul, a former janitor for Sterling, and was technically savvy enough to bug Sterling's office for years. You get the picture ... this sounds like a crazy person.

In the doc, he claims to have heard Sterling have hyper-racist convos about Beyonce, Chris Paul, Shaquille O'Neal, and Kim Kardashian -- and most of the language alleged in the document is far too racist to even repeat.

Some tame examples -- Sterling allegedly said Charles Barkley's head looks like a "retread tire" ... and when George Zimmerman was acquitted, he allegedly said ... "Buy that guy a beer." According to the docs Sterling even went to an IHOP with Paula Deen just to laugh at Black dishwashers.

Not shockingly ... the absurd request for a restraining order was quickly denied in a Florida District Court.

No word if this will affect Cliff's contract with State Farm.

But the story about J.J. Redick and his surreal first season with the Clippers captures the Donald Sterling experience as well as anyone's. At 29 years old and having made the calculated choice as a free agent last summer to come play for coach Doc Rivers and this talented team, Redick was exposed to the Sterling dysfunction from the start when his sign-and-trade deal to come to Los Angeles nearly fell apart after his four-year, $27-million deal had been agreed upon.

One of the alleged reasons? Sterling, the man whose racist comments sparked this whole furor, was believed to have had concerns about paying a white player that kind of money. He had once given white center Chris Kaman a five-year, $52 million deal, and how that contract panned out (or didn't, as Kaman played 195 games in the next four years of that deal and was traded to New Orleans with a year and a half left) appeared to be coloring Sterling's judgment on this deal. In a way, it was a mirror-image of the issue that would be front and center 10 months later.

"I've been told both ways: one, that he didn't want to pay me because I was white, and that he didn't want to pay me because I was a bench player," Redick said. "I didn't know (the deal almost fell apart) until after the fact. I just got a weird phone call from Doc on July 4, and I got off the phone and said to my wife, 'Something's going on.' He's like, 'You better play for me (expletive).' And I was like, 'Yeah, that's the plan. We figured this out two days ago, right?'

"And then he just rambled a bit. ... but he never really got into the nuts and bolts of what was happening. And then I got a call about 48 hours later from my agent, and he said, 'We wanted to keep you out of it, but here's what happened.'"

But Redick's lasting memory of the first round will be much more meaningful than any three-pointer. He'll remember the day his eyes were opened to racism like never before.

"I said this to someone the other day, (that) in the days after (the Sterling audio was revealed), it was the first time in my life where I was conscientious of the fact that the people I was talking to were black or Asian or Mexican," he said. "I don't look at people like that, so to hear those things come out of someone's mouth, it pisses you off."