Jada Pinkett-Smith talks Atlanta's strip club scene and sex trafficking



It’s hard to believe that in our world today, there are more slaves in the world than any other time in history. One of the most profitable and booming businesses globally is the buying and selling of people, especially in the sex slavery industry.

As you all may know by now, actress Jada Pinkett-Smith has been working hard to shed light on the human trafficking business, and she recently begn working on a documentary for CNN that shows how women are lured into the sex slave trade. While doing her research, she recently visited Atlanta and connected with women who began as strippers before they were forced into sex trafficking.

In a video update that she posted to her Facebook page, Jada said that her eyes have been opened to what’s going on right here under our noses, right in our backyards, to our daughters (and sons) who see a certain image in the media, but when they go out on their own and try to make that money, they get swept up before they even know what’s happened to them.

She wrote:

"I just finished my first day of shooting in Atlanta. I went to a wonderful facility called Well Spring and got to meet three really dynamic women who had been trafficked. I learned so much from them today and I really learned a lot about perception. How things are perceived and I think the thing that really caught me today was that one of these young ladies, really bright young girl. You know the gateway to trafficking for her was stripping. You know as we know here in Atlanta the strip culture is pretty prevalent.

She said she just wanted to be an independent chick. She wanted to make that money. She wanted to be that girl she saw in videos. She said she wanted to be that girl she heard in songs. She said it makes it okay. She said even in manipulating men into give me money for your body, it’s okay because of what the music tells us, it’s almost expected. I’m like, “Wow, that’s the messaging that can get a young girl caught up in a situation that she can’t get out of. That’s what happened to this girl.”

[She] went to the strip club and was making money and even decided, hey, a couple John’s here and there, it’s my thing I’m in control, I got this. Only to fall into the trap of no longer being in control and ended up being trafficked. So it gave me an idea of yet again….I’m always so focused on the messaging that men are receiving about women versus it help me see messaging that women are receiving for some little reason my little dunce self missed. I missed that. I missed that.

She goes on to say that she “missed” the turn when stripping was something that is to be glorified because when she was growing up, stripping wasn’t a goal or a career choice as it is for many women today.

I missed that young women were perceiving stripping as a way of being independent and balling. I missed that. I think that has something to do with my age because I was just talking to my girlfriend and I was like, “Hey, when we were coming up stripping was the bottom.” The stripping culture was not glorified when I was growing up. If you were stripping there was a problem. You were on drugs or something was wrong. Where as today, that’s not it. Girls look at strippers and go, “Yo, I want that!”


I totally didn’t see it until I talked to this girl today and I was like, “Oh man, okay!” So I guess my eyes just got opened and you would’ve thought that I’d caught that. I guess that just went right over my head but it help me understand how to tackle, how to see some of those myths that need to be broken; that messaging that needs to be broken that it’s the gateway. And then still struggle with the idea that a women still has to have her choice. That’s tough. That’s tough. I mean quite a dilemma in my own mind in this. It’s some things I have to reconcile with my own understanding.

Yeah, and that was my day. I’m learning, I’m learning as I go."


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