Taylor Swift's Glamour Photoshoot + some excerpts

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on the evolution of her albums:
"I'm not trying to shed my skin. I'm trying to be a new version of the person I've been my whole life. That's what's held my fans and me together. For a group of millions, it's odd how close I feel to them."

on choosing not to read certain articles:
"I know when not to read an article. Is it going to help my day? Is it important for my life? If the answer is no, then I just don't click.... I'm careful about getting sucked into the rabbit hole that is the Internet because, as a songwriter, I don't have the option of having thick skin. As a writer you have to be open to everything, and that includes pain, rejection, self-doubt, fear. I deal with that enough on my own. If you look hard enough, you could find somebody on the Internet criticizing every single thing about you. If you're me."

on being a role model:
“I find it relatively easy to keep my clothes on because I don’t really feel like taking them off. It’s not an urge I have. For me “risky” is revealing what really happened in my life through music. Risky is writing confessional songs and telling the true story about a person with enough details so everyone knows who that person is. That’s putting myself out there, maybe even more than taking my shirt off.”

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Seventy-five years ago this spring, the first issue of Glamour featured actress Ann Sheridan on the cover. She was 24, as Taylor Swift is now. Men were into her (Sheridan once reportedly got 250 marriage proposals in a week), women liked her style, and she was known for that rare celebrity blend of sincerity and humor. Well, Swift is today’s quintessential Glamour star—and a perfect choice for this, our 75th anniversary issue.

When we met up to talk at an Italian restaurant, it had been a year since her last cover: a year in which songs like “22” had defined female culture just as powerfully as Lena Dunham’s Girls had; a year in which she first felt not just the warmth but the heat of being famous; a year of more living. I wanted to hear how she was handling it all. So we ordered lattes and settled in.

Cindi Leive: ...I heard you were giving out dating advice on the Glamour shoot. To the hair and makeup team?
Taylor Swift: Oh my God. I talk about this stuff all the time.
CL: Here’s something our readers ask about constantly: When you feel like a guy you’re dating has the upper hand, how do you change the game?
TS: Freeze-out.
CL: What’s the freeze-out?
TS: You don’t respond to any of his texts or calls until he does something desperate [like] shows up. Or he calls and leaves a voice mail. Something that makes it very clear to you that he’s interested.
CL: Have you employed the freeze-out?
TS: [Nods. Pauses.] I think everyone should approach relationships from the perspective of playing it straight and giving someone the benefit of the doubt. Until he establishes that this is a game. And if it’s a game, you need to win. The best thing to do is just walk away from the table.
CL: Is that winning?
TS: It is when they come back. [Laughs.] And if they don’t, then they didn’t care enough to begin with.
CL: Another reader question: Is it too clingy and too insecure to say “I don’t like it when you don’t text me back right away”?
TS: Guarding your heart and protecting your dignity are a little bit more important than clarifying the emotions of someone who’s only texting you back three words. I’ve learned that from trying to figure out people who don’t deserve to be figured out. When someone seems mysterious, we like to romanticize that he’s “deep” or “complicated.” But a lot of the time, things are exactly as they seem…. For a long time I was drawn to—and still am drawn to—people I find very interesting. [But] someone who sits and talks about themselves for an hour, you start to maybe wonder if, rather than trying so hard to be interesting, they could be a little bit more interested.
CL: Is this a dating observation?
TS: It’s a human being observation.
CL: Give us a few more tricks.
TS: Never yell.
CL: Never yell?
TS: Silence speaks so much louder than screaming tantrums. Never give anyone an excuse to say that you’re crazy.
CL: So will you continue to write about your personal life?
TS: One of my big goals as a human being is to continue to write what’s really happening to me, even if it’s a tough pill to swallow for people around me... I do fear that if I ever were to have someone in my life who mattered, I would second-guess every one of my lyrics.

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