See How Much These 2014 Awards' Noms Look Like Their Real-Life Counterparts

Every awards season is crammed with stories based on real life, but this year we seem to be blessed with real people who are even more colorful than the famous actors playing them. From the charming con man with the combover who gave Christian Bale advice on how to play him, to the world-famous leader who inspired millions, here are the real people behind some of the year's best performances, presented side-by-side with the actors playing them on-screen. Who looks the most like their real-life counterpart? Which characters are basically made up entirely? Click through for the true story behind "based on a true story."





AMERICAN HUSTLE: CHRISTIAN BALE/MELVIN WEINBERG
Though he’s playing a character named Irving Rosenfeld, Bale met several times with Weinberg, the real-life inspiration for his character, before production began on American Hustle. The actor ultimately improvised lines based on what he learned from the convicted con artist.




DALLAS BUYERS CLUB: MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY/RON WOODROOF
McConaughey lost 50 pounds to play H.I.V. patient Woodroof, who started a “buyers club” to smuggle AIDS treatment medication across the border from Mexico. Embodying Woodroof’s Texas charm, meanwhile, came naturally.





AMERICAN HUSTLE: JENNIFER LAWRENCE/MARIE WEINBERG
Lawrence’s character Rosalyn may be American Hustle’s biggest departure from reality—the real Melvin Weinberg’s wife was much closer to his age, and eventually committed suicide years after the events shown in the film.




THE WOLF OF WALL STREET: LEONARDO DICAPRIO/JORDAN BELFORT
The real Jordan Belfort puts in a cameo at the end of The Wolf of Wall Street, highlighting just how physically different he is from Leonardo DiCaprio (though the hair, we admit, is spot-on).




FRUITVALE STATION: MICHAEL B. JORDAN/OSCAR GRANT III
Oscar Grant III became nationally famous after his death at the hands of San Francisco transit police in 2009. Jordan, a veteran child actor, had just the right combination of experience and anonymity to slip seamlessly into the role.


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