'Finding Dory': things we want to see + Plus Fish That Would Make Great Finding Nemo Characters

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Just keep swimming, just keep swimming ... until Nov. 25, 2015, when "Finding Dory" will swim into theaters everywhere. Ellen DeGeneres announced on her talk show April 2 that Pixar is finally making a sequel to the 2003 animated classic "Finding Nemo." The new film will center on DeGeneres' character, Dory the short-memoried regal blue tang who befriended Nemo's dad Marlin in the original.


"They say I'm one of the top five contenders to play Dory again," DeGeneres joked on her show. She went on to confirm that she would be voicing Dory again, and that she had read the script. "It's hilarious, it's fantastic, it's warm, it's everything you want it to be," she told her audience.

"Nemo" fans know the original film well, and they're certainly hoping DeGeneres is right in her enthusiastic endorsement of the sequel script. Here are seven things we'd like to see in the new flick.



Dory's memory loss
It just wouldn't be a film with "Dory" in the title without that character's infamous short-term memory loss. She managed to keep "42 Wallaby Way" in her cute little blue head, but very little else. We're imagining her memory loss is what leads to her getting lost in the first place. We wouldn't mind a reprise of "Just keep swimming" and possibly Dory's famed whale imitation, either.

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Nemo and Marlin
It's called "Finding Dory," but who's going to be hunting for her? We're guessing her clownfish pals Nemo and Marlin will try and return the favor in appreciation of Dory's good-natured -- if sometimes bumbling -- help in the first film.

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The Tank Gang
Oh yes, those lively characters Nemo met in a dentist's office tank have to come back, don't they? At the end of Nemo, they'd all escaped into the ocean, only to discover they couldn't get out of their plastic bags. We're going to assume Bloat, the porcupine fish voiced by Brad Garrett, popped his own baggie with his spines, then freed the others.


John Ratzenberger
The "Cheers" mailman has been called "Pixar's lucky charm," and he always voices a role in any Pixar film (so far he's done 13). In "Nemo," he voiced an entire school of moonfish, who formed arrows and other items to help and entertain Dory and Marlin. His scene was short but memorable -- maybe he'll get a little more voice time in this film.




If you’ve been wondering about what types of sea creatures could show up, here are 10 sea creatures that are not only native to the California coast, but could make great Finding Dorycharacters.

Garibaldi
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What they’re like: These fish maintain a very tight home environment. The male builds the nest, the female lays the eggs, and the male aggressively defends the eggs from predators—even humans.

Possible character: We don’t know anything about Dory’s family, but if she is in need of a protective figure (à la Marlin), a male Garibaldi is the way to go. These fish will go to any length to make sure their children are safe—even biting humans! A family of Garibaldi would be a nice touch, too—a loving mother, a protective father, and a school of children would provide interesting neighbors or friends for the fish we already know and love.



Giant kelpfish
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What they’re like: Giant Kelpfish live up to their name; not only do they live in rocky terrain among kelp and other large seaweed, but they can grow to be 61 cm (about two feet) long. These fish live up to four years.

What type of character: If Finding Dory needs a shy, nervous character, the giant kelpfish could be that character. As the name suggests, the kelpfish hangs out in groves of kelp, hiding. All of the hiding the kelpfish would translate well to a character that needs help coming out of its shell socially. Something else that could make the kelpfish adorkable is the fact that young giant kelpfish sometime school with small transparent mysid shrimp (below). It would be funny to have a shy kelpfish character whose only friend is a tiny shrimp who’s somehow more outgoing.



Mysid shrimp
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What they’re like: They might look like shrimp, but Mysid shrimp aren’t actually shirmp; they are shrimp-like crustaceans. The creatures live in fresh, brackish, and marine water in the Northern Hemisphere. Their second name,”opossum shrimp,” comes from the fact that the females have a brood pouch, a chamber where the female lays its eggs.

What type of character: The opossum shrimp would be a great animal for Pixar to work its magic with. There could be tons of gags done with this transparent animal. The big black eyes and hunched appearance of these creatures would also create a snarky, wise-cracking character who continually insists that he’s a shrimp, although, in reality, he’s not



Mola Mola
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What they’re like: Believe it or not, this lumbering-looking creature is actually a fish, despite the fact that it has no recognizable tail fin. The mola mola, also called the ocean sunfish, is a record holder for being the heaviest bony fish in the world. It also feeds on tons and tons of jellyfish, which kind of makes sense, seeing how huge and circular the mola mola is. The lumpy-looking mound of flesh at the fish’s end is what makes the mola mola extremely unique; this piece of flesh is called the clavus and acts as its tail fin. The clavus arose through the mola mola’s evolutionary journey.

What type of character: Despite its size, the mola mola is a docile creature. So, it’s almost a no-brainer for Pixar to create a mola mola character that is a gentle giant. It’s easy to imagine that Dory and her collection of friends would need some sort of guide through the new and strange California waters and a mola mola who loves looking out for others would be great in that role. It would also be a good callback to Crush, the Pacific green sea turtle who guided Dory and Marlin through the ocean to find the dentist’s office Nemo was trapped in.



Bat ray

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What they’re like: The bat ray is also called the eagle ray because of how the animal flaps its wings to swim. The bat ray dig in the sand to find their food and despite their docile demeanor, they have venomous barbed spines on the base of their tails. These spines are only used for self-defense.

What type of character: Even though parodying Batman might not be kosher for Pixar since Disney owns Marvel, it would only be too cool if a bat ray character riffed on The Dark Knight. The bat ray already seems to favor the life of Bruce Wayne; bat rays generally live alone. Bat rays can also sometimes be seen in extremely large groups, just like how Bruce Wayne sometimes partners with the Justice League. A loner bat ray that (seemingly) begrudgingly follows Dory on her journey would give Pixar a lot to work with when it comes to creating unique dynamics between characters.


Rest of the lists at both Sources

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Source 2


What would you like to see in "Finding Dory"?