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11:23 pm - 02/07/2013

Oscars 2013: Great Performances photographed by Paola Kudacki for Time Magazine, March 2013




Philip Seymour Hoffman
Performance: Lancaster Dodd in The Master (Oscar nomination, Best Supporting Actor)
“L. Ron Hubbard is the reference, but it isn’t L. Ron Hubbard,” says Hoffman, who portrays a 1950s cult leader. “There are things he does that are referenced in L. Ron Hubbard’s life, but ultimately there is no adherence to any fact. We took liberties because he is a fictional character.”


Sally Field
Performance: Mary Todd Lincoln in Lincoln (Oscar nomination, Best Supporting Actress) 
“Had there not been a Mary Todd, there wouldn’t have been an Abraham Lincoln,” Field says of the mercurial First Lady. “She was complicated and brilliant, and she had a keen sense of where she would be placed in history — she would not be looked at fondly.”


John Goodman
Performance: John Chambers in Argo 
Chambers created the makeup for Planet of the Apes, designed Spock’s ears and had a sideline working for the CIA. “He’s a man who serves his country,” Goodman says. “He has a double life, a secret life, and at the same time, he disguises people for a living.”




Amy Adams
Performance: Peggy Dodd in The Master (Oscar nomination, Best Supporting Actress) 
“We were a society in transition,” says Adams of The Master’s postwar setting. “Women were given responsibility in wartime, and then it was back to the kitchen and take care of your man. The perception of what was available to women in that era was so different.”
Hugh Jackman
Performance: Jean Valjean in Les Misérables (Oscar nomination, Best Actor)
“One of Victor Hugo’s main themes is how harsh and wasteful the jail system was,” says Jackman, whose Jean Valjean served 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread. “The goal wasn’t to turn you out rehabilitated. The goal was to turn you out as an animal.” 

Anne Hathaway
Performance: Fantine in Les Misérables (Oscar nomination, Best Supporting Actress) 
“As a woman born in 1982, I take for granted so many freedoms that Fantine wouldn’t even dream of,” says Hathaway, who did voluminous research on everything from 19th century French law to modern-day sex slavery to play a doomed prostitute.


John Hawkes
Performance: Mark O’Brien in The Sessions 
“Mark O’Brien used to say that disabled people are invisible to able-bodied people,” says Hawkes, who plays the writer and polio survivor in The Sessions. “In between takes, I’d stay on a gurney, and crew members would set sandwiches and wardrobe people would lay coats on me. I got some idea of what it’s like to be thought of as furniture.”

Quvenzhané Wallis
Performance: Hushpuppy in Beasts of the Southern Wild (Oscar nomination, Best Actress) 
Benh Zeitlin’s magical-realist take on Hurricane Katrina rests on the tiny shoulders of its charismatic star, who at 9 is the youngest Best Actress contender in Oscar history. “I wasn’t surprised on the outside,” Wallis says of the nomination, “but I was on the inside.”

Jessica Chastain
Performance: Maya in Zero Dark Thirty (Oscar nomination, Best Actress) 
“Because we’re playing characters that really exist, it was important to show the utmost respect when portraying them,” says Chastain, who has never met the real-life inspiration for Maya, the CIA tracker who hunts bin Laden.




Videos of the interviews at the source
vonlisbon 7th-Feb-2013 11:33 pm (UTC)
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“In between takes, I’d stay on a gurney, and crew members would set sandwiches and wardrobe people would lay coats on me. I got some idea of what it’s like to be thought of as furniture.”


Why not just use a wheelchair for a week? I get the metaphor but it would actually probably be easier to "try out" the real thing rather than the metaphor you use to explain the real thing.
starchain 7th-Feb-2013 11:46 pm (UTC)
his character isn't on a wheelchair, what he did is actually the closest thing he could do to try out his character.
vonlisbon 8th-Feb-2013 12:27 am (UTC)
Okay - in that case, what disability did his character have where the majority of people who have that disability sit on a gurney and have people throw sandwiches and jackets on them?
vonlisbon 8th-Feb-2013 12:28 am (UTC)
I mean I get that it says "polio survivor" but that means almost nothing in terms of how much it could impact the human body's ability to move.
starchain 8th-Feb-2013 12:31 am (UTC)
He was confined to an iron lung and couldn't even sit up straight, couldn't move, spent all his life lying down.
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