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7:06 pm - 01/15/2013

Aidan Turner's Kili: The Most Attractive Dwarf of Middle-Earth?



Born in 1983 Irishman Aidan Turner briefly appeared in the series The Tudors, but he became widely known through the BBC-series Being Human where he played a vampire. In Peter Jackson’s film adaptation of The Hobbit, he plays the dwarf Kili, the younger brother of Fili and nephew of Thorin Oakenshield. NAUTILUS reporter Alexander Huiskes could do an exclusive interview with Aidan Turner.

Hello, Mr. Turner.
Call me Aidan, Mr. Turner sounds too formal.

How did you get this role?
This is pretty much the first question everybody asks me. Do you really want to hear all stages of the decision process? Such a casting develops over a long time and each one is different. During the Castings a thousand things run through your head, but I was relieved and in awe when I was cast. Peter Jackson made film history with The Lord of the Rings and suddenly I was part of this universe, which is based on stories that were created long before my birth. I was very very happy. And curious how Kili would feel during the filming.

When you knew that you were cast as a dwarf …
(Interrupts) … although I’m pretty much the average human size …

… How did you prepare for that?
When the decision was made, I had twelve weeks of intensive training, fitness training, sword fighting, fight choreography, dress rehearsals, and of course I had to read the script and the novel The Hobbit.

What does it feel like when you play a dwarf and deal with objects and backgrounds, which are scaled differently?
Aren’t we all somehow dwarves – some bigger, the other smaller? (Laughs) No, most of the work was really done by the camera people with different perspectives. You get used to the rest pretty quickly.



When I showed women pictures of Thorin's company they were quick to agree that you’re the most attractive of the dwarves. Do you think for the female audience Kili could be what Legolas was in Lord of the Rings?
First off, congratulations to you, you know women with a good taste. (Laughs) But I do not think I particularly stand out. The Hobbit is an ensemble film and each of us dwarves is remarkable, much more than in the book.

How great was the influence of John Rhys Davis’ portrayal of Gimli in The Lord of the Rings?
Wow, nobody has asked me that yet. I think Gloin had the most trouble because he plays Gimli’s father. But John’s performance was a benchmark for all of us. Each of the dwarves is a unique figure and not intended to act as a second Gimli. But as an actor, you look very closely and the question is always: Why did he do that? What does he say about the character? What would work for my figure what not? And still above all hovers a very different pressure. As a big fan of Tolkien John will look very carefully at our movies. I hope he will find us convincing as his predecessor figures and generation.

Can you describe your Kili?
I could immediately identify with him and I think he is a good role model. Kili is brave, loyal, curious, open-minded and believes in friendship.

Were you satisfied with his last scene?
[Spoiler (click to open)]I can not imagine to be satisfied with your own death. It was incredibly hard, harder than I had originally thought, but I think he gains depth for the audience.

Soon you play Luke in the film adaptation of Cassandra Clare’s youth book series, beginning with City of Bones. What role will prove more important for your future career – J.R.R. Tolkiens dwarf or Cassandra Clare’s werewolf?
My God, if I only knew. I have no idea, they were both fun. How about this: You watch all the movies and we talk about it again in a year, okay?

I’ll definitely do that. But for now we look forward to the first part of The Hobbit. Thanks for the interview!
You’re welcome. Have fun at the cinema!


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