ONTD

12:29 pm - 08/11/2012

ADULT FICTION/NONFICTION BOOK POST




Lionel Asbo: The State of England by Martin Amis



Release date: August 21, 2012

Author known for: Money (1984), London Fields (1989), Time's Arrow (1991), being the crotchety son of Kingsley Amis


A savage, funny, and mysteriously poignant saga by a renowned author at the height of his powers.

Lionel Asbo, a terrifying yet weirdly loyal thug (self-named after England's notorious Anti-Social Behaviour Order), has always looked out for his ward and nephew, the orphaned Desmond Pepperdine. He provides him with fatherly career advice (always carry a knife, for example) and is determined they should share the joys of pit bulls (fed with lots of Tabasco sauce), Internet porn, and all manner of more serious criminality. Des, on the other hand, desires nothing more than books to read and a girl to love (and to protect a family secret that could be the death of him). But just as he begins to lead a gentler, healthier life, his uncle - once again in a London prison - wins £140 million in the lottery and upon his release hires a public relations firm and begins dating a cannily ambitious topless model and "poet." Strangely, however, Lionel's true nature remains uncompromised while his problems, and therefore also Desmond's, seem only to multiply.

Available for pre-order in hardcover or on kindle.


Winter Journal by Paul Auster



Release date: August 21, 2012

Author known for: The New York Trilogy (1967), The Music of Chance (1990), Invisible (2009)


From the bestselling novelist and author of The Invention of Solitude, a moving and highly personal meditation on the body, time, and language itself.

That is where the story begins, in your body, and everything will end in the body as well.

Facing his sixty-third winter, internationally acclaimed novelist Paul Auster sits down to write a history of his body and its sensations - both pleasurable and painful.

Thirty years after the publication of The Invention of Solitude, in which he wrote so movingly about fatherhood, Auster gives us a second unconventional memoir in which he writes about his mother's life and death. Winter Journal is a highly personal meditation on the body, time, and memory, by one of our most intellectually elegant writers.

Available for pre-order in hardcover or on kindle.


The Devil in Silver by Victor LaValle



Release date: August 21, 2012

Author known for: Slapboxing With Jesus (1999), The Ecstatic (2002), Big Machine (2009)


New Hyde Hospital's psychiatric ward has a new resident. It also has a very, very old one.

Pepper is a rambunctious big man, minor-league troublemaker, working-class hero (in his own mind), and, suddenly, the surprised inmate of a budget-strapped mental institution in Queens, New York. He's not mentally ill, but that doesn’t seem to matter. He is accused of a crime he can't quite square with his memory. In the darkness of his room on his first night, he's visited by a terrifying creature with the body of an old man and the head of a bison who nearly kills him before being hustled away by the hospital staff. It's no delusion: The other patients confirm that a hungry devil roams the hallways when the sun goes down. Pepper rallies three other inmates in a plot to fight back: Dorry, an octogenarian schizophrenic who's been on the ward for decades and knows all its secrets; Coffee, an African immigrant with severe OCD, who tries desperately to send alarms to the outside world; and Loochie, a bipolar teenage girl who acts as the group's enforcer. Battling the pill-pushing staff, one another, and their own minds, they try to kill the monster that's stalking them. But can the Devil die?

The Devil in Silver brilliantly brings together the compelling themes that spark all of Victor LaValle's radiant fiction: faith, race, class, madness, and our relationship with the unseen and the uncanny. More than that, it's a thrillingly suspenseful work of literary horror about friendship, love, and the courage to slay our own demons.

Available for pre-order in hardcover or on kindle.


NW by Zadie Smith



Release date: September 4, 2012

Author known for: White Teeth (2000), The Autograph Man (2002), On Beauty (2005)


This is the story of a city.

The northwest corner of a city. Here you'll find guests and hosts, those with power and those without it, people who live somewhere special and others who live nowhere at all. And many people in between.

Every city is like this. Cheek-by-jowl living. Separate worlds.

And then there are the visitations: the rare times a stranger crosses a threshold without permission or warning, causing a disruption in the whole system. Like the April afternoon a woman came to Leah Hanwell's door, seeking help, disturbing the peace, forcing Leah out of her isolation...

Zadie Smith's brilliant tragi-comic new novel follows four Londoners - Leah, Natalie, Felix and Nathan – as they try to make adult lives outside of Caldwell, the council estate of their childhood. From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, their London is a complicated place, as beautiful as it is brutal, where the thoroughfares hide the back alleys and taking the high road can sometimes lead you to a dead end.

Depicting the modern urban zone – familiar to town-dwellers everywhere – Zadie Smith's NW is a quietly devastating novel of encounters, mercurial and vital, like the city itself.

Available for pre-order in hardcover and on kindle.


The Forgetting Tree by Tatjana Soli



Release date: September 4, 2012

Author known for: The Lotus Eaters (2010)


From The New York Times bestselling author of The Lotus Eaters, a novel of a California ranching family, its complicated matriarch and an enigmatic caretaker who may destroy them.

When Claire Nagy marries Forster Baumsarg, the only son of prominent California citrus ranchers, she knows she's consenting to a life of hard work, long days, and worry-fraught nights. But her love for Forster is so strong, she turns away from her literary education and embraces the life of the ranch, succumbing to its intoxicating rhythms and bounty until her love of the land becomes a part of her. Not even the tragic, senseless death of her son Joshua at kidnappers' hands, her alienation from her two daughters, or the dissolution of her once-devoted marriage can pull her from the ranch she's devoted her life to preserving.

But despite having survived the most terrible of tragedies, Claire is about to face her greatest struggle: An illness that threatens not only to rip her from her land but take her very life. And she's chosen a caregiver, the enigmatic Caribbean-born Minna, who may just be the darkest force of all.

Haunting, tough, triumphant, and profound, The Forgetting Tree explores the intimate ties we have to one another, the deepest fears we keep to ourselves, and the calling of the land that ties every one of us together.

Available for pre-order in hardcover or on kindle.


Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures by Emma Straub



Release date: September 4, 2012

Author known for: Other People We Married (2012)


The enchanting story of a midwestern girl who escapes a family tragedy and is remade as a movie star during Hollywood's golden age.

In 1920, Elsa Emerson, the youngest and blondest of three sisters, is born in idyllic Door County, Wisconsin. Her family owns the Cherry County Playhouse, and more than anything, Elsa relishes appearing onstage, where she soaks up the approval of her father and the embrace of the audience. But when tragedy strikes her family, her acting becomes more than a child's game of pretend.

While still in her teens, Elsa marries and flees to Los Angeles. There she is discovered by Irving Green, one of the most powerful executives in Hollywood, who refashions her as a serious, exotic brunette and renames her Laura Lamont. Irving becomes Laura's great love; she becomes an Academy Award­-winning actress - and a genuine movie star. Laura experiences all the glamour and extravagance of the heady pinnacle of stardom in the studio-system era, but ultimately her story is a timeless one of a woman trying to balance career, family, and personal happiness, all while remaining true to herself.

Ambitious and richly imagined, Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures is as intimate - and as bigger-than-life - as the great films of the golden age of Hollywood. Written with warmth and verve, it confirms Emma Straub's reputation as one of the most exciting new talents in fiction.

Available for pre-order in hardcover or on kindle.


Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon



Release date: September 11, 2012

Author known for: Wonder Boys (1995), the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000), The Yiddish Policemen's Union (2007)


As the summer of 2004 draws to a close, Archy Stallings and Nat Jaffe are still hanging in there - longtime friends, bandmates, and co-regents of Brokeland Records, a kingdom of used vinyl located in the borderlands of Berkeley and Oakland. Their wives, Gwen Shanks and Aviva Roth-Jaffe, are the Berkeley Birth Partners, two semi-legendary midwives who have welcomed more than a thousand newly minted citizens into the dented utopia at whose heart - half tavern, half temple - stands Brokeland.

When ex-NFL quarterback Gibson Goode, the fifth-richest black man in America, announces plans to build his latest Dogpile megastore on a nearby stretch of Telegraph Avenue, Nat and Archy fear it means certain doom for their vulnerable little enterprise. Meanwhile, Aviva and Gwen also find themselves caught up in a battle for their professional existence, one that tests the limits of their friendship. Adding another layer of complication to the couples' already tangled lives is the surprise appearance of Titus Joyner, the teenage son Archy has never acknowledged and the love of fifteen-year-old Julius Jaffe's life.

An intimate epic, a NorCal Middlemarch set to the funky beat of classic vinyl soul-jazz and pulsing with a virtuosic, pyrotechnical style all its own, Telegraph Avenue is the great American novel we've been waiting for. Generous, imaginative, funny, moving, thrilling, humane, triumphant, it is Michael Chabon's most dazzling book yet

Available for pre-order in hardcover and on kindle.


This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz



Release date: September 11, 2012

Author's notable works: Drown (1996), the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007)


Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz's first book, Drown, established him as a major new writer with "the dispassionate eye of a journalist and the tongue of a poet" (Newsweek). His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, was named #1 Fiction Book of the Year by Time magazine and spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, establishing itself – with more than a million copies in print – as a modern classic. In addition to the Pulitzer, Díaz has won a host of major awards and prizes, including the National Book Critic's Circle Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, the PEN/O. Henry Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and the Anisfield-Wolf Award.

Now Díaz turns his remarkable talent to the haunting, impossible power of love – obsessive love, illicit love, fading love, maternal love. On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In the heat of a hospital laundry room in New Jersey, a woman does her lover's washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness - and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses: artistic Alma; the aging Miss Lora; Magdalena, who thinks all Dominican men are cheaters; and the love of his life, whose heartbreak ultimately becomes his own. In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, the stories in This Is How You Lose Her lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that "the half-life of love is forever."

Available for pre-order in hardcover and on kindle.


Between Heaven and Here by Susan Straight



Release date: September 12, 2012

Author's notable works: Blacker Than a Thousand Midnights (1995), Highwire Moon (2001), A Million Nightingales (2006)


In August in Rio Seco, California, the ground is too hard to bury a body. But Glorette Picard is dead, and across the canal, out in the orange groves, they'll gather shovels and pickaxes and soak the dirt until they can lay her coffin down. First, someone needs to find her son Victor, who memorizes SAT words to avoid the guys selling rock, and someone needs to tell her uncle Enrique, who will be the one to hunt down her killer, and someone needs to brush out her perfect crown of hair and paint her cracked toenails. As the residents of this dry-creek town prepare to bury their own, it becomes clear that Glorette's life and death are deeply entangled with the dark history of the city and the untouchable beauty that, finally, killed her.

Available for pre-order in hardcover.


May We Be Forgiven by A. M. Homes



Release date: September 27, 2012

Author known for: The Safety of Objects (1990), The End of Alice (1996), Music for Torching (1999), writing for HBO's The L Word


A darkly comic novel of twenty-first-century domestic life and the possibility of personal transformation.

Harold Silver has spent a lifetime watching his younger brother, George, a taller, smarter, and more successful high-flying TV executive, acquire a covetable wife, two kids, and a beautiful home in the suburbs of New York City. But Harry, a historian and Nixon scholar, also knows George has a murderous temper, and when George loses control the result is an act of violence so shocking that both brothers are hurled into entirely new lives in which they both must seek absolution.

Harry finds himself suddenly playing parent to his brother's two adolescent children, tumbling down the rabbit hole of Internet sex, dealing with aging parents who move through time like travelers on a fantastic voyage. As Harry builds a twenty-first-century family created by choice rather than biology, we become all the more aware of the ways in which our history, both personal and political, can become our destiny and either compel us to repeat our errors or be the catalyst for change.

May We Be Forgiven is an unnerving, funny tale of unexpected intimacies and of how one deeply fractured family might begin to put itself back together.

Available for pre-order in hardcover and on kindle.


Source: Goodreads for plot synopses, Amazon for release dates
rinanina101 Re: What did y'all read this summer?11th-Aug-2012 08:10 pm (UTC)
i read "To Kill a Mockingbird" for the first time ever. I think it's my fave book now.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Animal Farm
House of Night book 1
Catcher in the Rye

And a bunch of fanfiction. Does that count?


Quick Question: Currently I'm reading Lord of the Rings trilogy for the first time. I'm only about 60 pages in and it's been kinda boring so far. Should I finish? And should I have read the Hobbit first?
sassalicious Re: What did y'all read this summer?11th-Aug-2012 08:23 pm (UTC)
Yes you should finish. It does pick up but there will be slow spots throughout. The appendices are nice to read at the end. The Hobbit isn't necessary to read first, but it can be helpful, iirc. Definitely read it thoug.
kurtvonnegut 11th-Aug-2012 08:25 pm (UTC)
if you don't like the first 60 pages you won't like the rest of it. it's dry the whole way through. i personally read the first two and then gave up but so many people love the series so who knows.
shallowlove_x Re: What did y'all read this summer?11th-Aug-2012 08:26 pm (UTC)
I would say stick with it. It's a trilogy that feels really rewarding once read, but it can feel so damn long while reading. There's a lot of descriptions that seem to go on forever so it can be hard to read, but I think it becomes more interesting once you get more immersed in it and used to the style of writing.

While I'm really looking forward to the movie, I never found The Hobbit to be particularly interesting. It is a much simpler book but I didn't enjoy it too much.
soavantgarde 11th-Aug-2012 08:38 pm (UTC)
to kill a mockingbird is one of my favorite books of all time, A+ taste susie

I loved the hobbit and fotr but I got too bored to finish tt. the hobbit is definitely easier to get through, it's more of a children's story than tolkein dropping a shitton of mythology and whatnot on you in the driest way possible, but it definitely not necessary to read it before lotr
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